Microminerals

Microminerals

Zinc

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An essential mineral which forms the prosthetic group of a large number of enzymes, and also the receptor proteins for steroid and thyroid hormones and vitamin A and vitamin D. Deficiency results in hypogonadism and delayed puberty, small stature, and mild anaemia; it occurs mainly in subtropical regions where a great deal of zinc is lost in sweat, and the diet is largely based on unleavened wholemeal bread, in which much of the zinc is unavailable because of the high content of phytate.

Selenium

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Selenium is a nutrient (micro-mineral). It is a nonmetallic element with an atomic number of 34 and an atomic weight of 78.96. Its chemical symbol is Se. Selenium is most commonly found in nature in its inorganic form, sodium selenite. An organic form of selenium, selenomethionine, is found in foods.

General Use

Manganese

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Manganese is nutrient (micro-mineral). It is a metallic element, essential in the diet but required in very small amounts. It is a component of a number of enzyme systems, including those involved in the synthesis of cartilage. Good sources of manganese include nuts, legumes, wholegrains, leafy vegetables, and fruit. Deficiency is unknown in humans, therefore there are no recommended intakes.

Copper

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Copper is an essential nutrient (micro-mineral). It is an essential mineral that plays an important role in iron absorption and transport. It is considered a trace mineral because it is needed in very small amounts. Only 70–80 mg of copper are found in the body of a normal healthy person. Even though the body needs very little, copper is an important nutrient that holds many vital functions in the body.

Copper is essential for normal development of the body because it:

* Participates in a wide variety of important enzymatic reactions in the body.

Chromium

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Chromium is an essential nutrient (micro-mineral). It is a metallic element essential in the diet for efficient carbohydrate metabolism. It improves the ability of insulin to convert glucose to glycogen (the main energy store in muscles).

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