Graviola Tree / Brazilian Paw Paw

Graviola Tree / Brazilian Paw Paw

There is fairly reliable evidence that a pharmaceutical company sat on this product for several years trying to synthesize one of its nutrients. In any case, there is very good scientific evidence from studies that this product is for real, if the quality of the manufacturing is good.

Though the pawpaw compounds also inhibited ATP production in noncancerous cells and nonresistant
cancer cells, those cells were not affected as dramatically, McLaughlin says.

"Normal cells and standard cancer cells may be able to minimize the effects of this compound because they
don't require the vast amounts of energy needed by the pump-running cells," McLaughlin says. "The
resistant cell is using its extra energy for this pump as well as to grow, so it is really taxed for energy.
When we mess with the energy supply, it kills the cell."

McLaughlin and his group then did a follow-up study to test a series of 14 structurally similar pawpaw
compounds to determine the structural features that maximize this biological activity in multidrug-resistant
cancer cells. The results were published in the June issue of tbe Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.
"This study tells us how to maximize this activity, so we have a pretty good idea what compounds we'd like
to try in animals with multidrug-resistant tumors," McLaughlin says.

If proven effective in animals and humans, McLaughlin says, the compounds may be used to treat
multidrug resistance in a variety of cancers, because many types of cancer cells develop resistance by
employing a pump.

The studies were ftinded by National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, the Indiana Elks Cancer
Research Fund and Purdue Research Foundation. Purdue has filed a patent on the use of the pawpaw
compounds.

SOURCES:

Jerry McLaughlin, (765) 494-1455; e-mail, iac(a),pharmacv.purdue.edu
Writer: Susan Gaidos, (765) 494-2081; e-mail, susan gaidos@uns.purdue.edu
Purdue News Service: (765) 494-2096; e-mail, purduenews(a)uns.purdue.edu
ABSTRACT: Cancer Letters 115 (1997) 73-79

The Annonaceous acetogenin bullatacin is cytotoxic against multidrug-resistant human mammary
adenocarcinoma cells

Nicholas H. Oberlies, Vicki L. Croy, Marietta L Harrison, Jerry L McLaughlin
Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal
Sciences, Purdue University.

Cytotoxic effects of the Annonaceous acetogenin, bullatacin, were studied in multidrug-resistant (MDR)
human mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7/Adr) cells vs. the parental non-resistant wild type (MCF-7/wt)
cells. Buliatacin was effectively cytotoxic to the MCF-7/Adr cells while it was more cytostatic to the MCF-
7/wt cells. ATP depletion is the mode of action of the Annonaceous acetogenins, and these agents offer a
special advantage in the chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR tumors that have ATP-dependent
mechanisms.

ABSTRACT:/ Med Chem. 1997, 40, 2102-2106
Structure-activity relationships of diverse Annonaceous acetogenins against multidrug-resistant human
mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7/Adr) cells

Nicholas H. Oberlies, Ching-Jer Chang, Jerry L McLaughlin
Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal
Sciences, Purdue University.

Fourteen structurally diverse Amionaceous acetogenins, representing the three main classes of bis-adjacent
bis-nonadjacent, and single-THF ring(s), were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of adriamycinresistant
human mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7/Adr) cells. Among a series of bis-adjacent THF ring
acetogenins, those with the stereochemistry of threo-trans-threo-trans-erythro (from C-15 to C-24) were the
most potent with as much as 250 times the potency of adriamycin. The acetogenins may, thus, have
chemotherapeutic potential, especially with regard to MDR tumors.

Share this with your friends
AttachmentSize
Graviola Tree and cancer.pdf855.59 KB
Graviola Tree cancer treatment.pdf1009.91 KB