Why seafood isn't always the best source of Omega-3 fatty acids

Why seafood isn't always the best source of Omega-3 fatty acids

...The modern diet is full of omega-6 fatty acids--such as those found in corn, safflower, sunflower, peanut and canola oils--but very low in omega-3 fatty acids. We have also seen that increasing omega-3 intake can improve blood flow, reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke, improve brain function, reduce inflammation, improve the immune system, and inhibit the formation of cancer.

While most studies have shown that eating fish even once a week reduces heart attack and stroke risk, there are serious drawbacks to eating fish containing large amounts of omega-3 fatty acids. The main danger is that fish with the highest omega-3 fatty acid content also have the highest methylmercury levels. Serious accumulations of mercury can occur from eating these types of fish regularly. Another concern is pesticide and herbicide residue in seafood. We know that fish tend to accumulate and retain these poisons for long periods of time, and that bottom-feeding animals (shrimp, oysters, crabs, and lobsters) present the greatest risk. In the case of seafood from the Gulf coast, the problem is that all of the giant industries, refineries, aluminum plants, and fertilizer plants dump their waste into the Mississippi River, which empties out into the Gulf. All of these bottom-feeding creatures contain significant levels of mercury, lead, and other heavy metals as well.

Health and Nutrition Secrets (that could save your life), Dr Russell L. Blaylock, MD

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