The Case For Veganism (No Animal Food, Nutrition and Diet, Vegetable Recipes)

PREFACE

The title of this book is not ambiguous, but as it relates to a subject rarely thought about by the generality of people, it may save some misapprehension if at once it is plainly stated that the following pages are in vindication of a dietary consisting wholly of products of the vegetable kingdom, and which therefore excludes not only flesh, fish, and fowl, but milk and eggs and products manufactured therefrom.

MAN'S FOOD

Health and happiness are within reach of those who provide themselves with good food, clean water, fresh air, and exercise.

A ceaseless and relentless hand is laid on almost every animal to provide food for human beings.

Nothing that lives or grows is missed by man in his search for food to satisfy his appetite.

Natural appetite is satisfied with vegetable food, the basis for highest and best health and development.

History of primitive man we know, but the possibilities of perfected and complete man are not yet attained.

Adequate and pleasant food comes to us from the soil direct, favorable for health, and a preventive against disease.

Plant food is man's natural diet; ample, suitable, and available; obtainable with least labor and expense, and in pleasing form and variety.

Animal food will be useful in emergency, also at other times; still, plant substance is more favorable to health, endurance, and power of mind.

Variety of food is desirable and natural; it is abundantly supplied by the growth of the soil under cultivation.[Pg 6]
Races of intelligence and strength are to be found subsisting and thriving on an exclusive plant grown diet.

The health and patience of vegetarians meet the social, mental and physical tests of life with less disease, and less risk of dependence in old age.

Meat eaters have no advantages which do not belong also to those whose food is vegetable.

Plant food, the principal diet of the world, has one serious drawback; it is not always savory, or palatable.

Plant diet to be savory requires fat, or oil, to be added to it; nuts, peanut, and olive oil, supply it to the best advantage.

Plant diet with butter, cream, milk, cheese, eggs, lard, fat, suet, or tallow added to it, is not vegetarian; it is mixed diet; the same in effect as if meat were used.—Elmer Lee, M.D., Editor, Health Culture Magazine.[Pg 7]

CONTENTS
PAGE
No Animal Food
I —THE URGENCY OF THE SUBJECT 9
II —PHYSICAL CONSIDERATIONS 17
III —ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS 35
IV —THE ÆSTHETIC POINT OF VIEW 46
V —ECONOMICAL CONSIDERATIONS 52
VI —THE EXCLUSION OF DAIRY PRODUCE 58
VII —CONCLUSION 63
Nutrition and Diet
I —SCIENCE OF NUTRITION 70
II —WHAT TO EAT 82
III —WHEN TO EAT 97
IV —HOW TO EAT 103
Food Table 108
Recipes 111

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