Pregnancy. How to Have Healthy, Intelligent Babies and Prevent Postpartum Depression

During the last trimester of pregnancy, 80% of the work being done on the fetus is focused on the brain. The brain will actually double in size. So if the brain is made up of 60% fats, it is vital that mom be getting high quality essential fats into her diet. It is equally important that you avoid the damaged fats like trans fats so they don’t find their way into the baby’s brain.

So if mom is not diligent about getting Omega 3 into her diet, the fetus will take it from her largest source: her [the mother’s] brain. Now, how many moms do you know that say they lose their brain after their baby is born? They have problem with focus, concentration, memory, depression; you know postpartum depression. We need these fats as much as the baby does.

My name is Mary Toscano and I’m a certified nutrition educator. I’ve created a video called “Fabulous Fats! Setting the Record Straight.” Fabulous Fats! clarifies the importance of fats in our diets and explains which are the good fats to get into the diet and which are the ones to avoid.

One of the most important times that’s absolute imperative to have this knowledge is during pregnancy. What most people don’t know is that the brain is made of 60% fats. Fats are absolutely critical to a high functioning, sharp, intelligent mind.

During the last trimester of pregnancy, 80% of the work being done on the fetus is focused on the brain. The brain will actually double in size. So if the brain is made up of 60% fats, it is vital that mom be getting high quality essential fats into her diet. It is equally important that you avoid the damaged fats like trans fats so they don’t find their way into the baby’s brain.

Getting good fats into the diet is also important after the baby is born because breast milk will be high in fats to continue this brain growth. One of the most important fats to be getting into the diet are fats from the Omega 3 family. Omega 3 fats are fast moving fats that are critical for optimal brain and eye function. These fats are called essential fatty acids, which means the body can’t make them on its own. It needs to get them from food. The problem is that the Standard American Diet, also known as SAD, has very little if any Omega 3 in it. In fact, 20% of Americans have Omega 3 levels so low, they defy detection.

So if mom is not diligent about getting Omega 3 into her diet, the fetus will take it from her largest source: her [the mother’s] brain. Now, how many moms do you know that say they lose their brain after their baby is born? They have problem with focus, concentration, memory, depression; you know postpartum depression. We need these fats as much as the baby does.

But most people don’t know the difference between the good fat and the bad fat and they don’t want to get fat so they avoid them all. And with more kids than ever on drugs to correct the imbalances in their brain, providing healthy fats that the brain needs is a good place to start.

Fabulous Fats! is a simple way to get up to speed fast on the good fats to be getting into the diet and the fats to avoid. It is particularly important information for pregnant and nursing moms since they are providing the fats necessary for the developing brain and typical prenatal vitamins are not going to cover this need.

It’s time we start getting fats back into our diet in a healthy way and get off this low-fat craze which has caused more damage than good to our health.

What is fat?

For most people the word fat is associated with the padding on their bellies and hips used to store excess calories. But those bulges aren't fat per se – they’re adipose tissue, which the body uses to store special molecules called fatty acids. Fatty acids perform a wide variety of functions in the body, functions so vital to our health and well-being that we would instantly fall over and die without them.

This distinction between adipose tissue and fatty acids (or fats) is important. To understand the purpose of fats and their value, we must see them as more than just a curse to our waistlines.

Why are fats good?

Good Fats Are Important!

Watch this video learn why Good fats are especially important for pregnant and nursing women.
The human body uses fatty acids to do everything from building cell membranes to performing key functions in the brain, eyes, and lungs. The functions of fats include:

Brain - Fats compose 60% of the brain and are essential to brain function, including learning abilities, memory retention and moods.

Heart - 60% of our heart’s energy comes from burning fats. Specific fats are also used to help keep the heart beating in a regular rhythm.

Nerves - Fats compose the myelin sheath that insulates and protects the nerves, isolating electrical impulses and speeding their transmission.

Lungs - Lung surfactant, which requires a high concentration of saturated fats, enables the lungs to work and keeps them from collapsing.

Eyes - Fats are essential to eye function, and are a key component of the rods and cones.

Digestion - Fats in a meal slow down the digestion process so the body has more time to absorb nutrients. Fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) can only be absorbed if fat is present. Fats in a meal, help provide a constant level of energy and keeps the body satiated for longer periods of time.

Hormones - Fats are required to make hormones and hormone-like substances called prostaglandins found in every tissue, cell and organ in the body.

Skin & hair - Ever heard of feeding oil to a dog to make their coat shiny? Humans get their soft skin and hair from fats.

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