T cell: One type of white blood cell that attacks virus-infected cells, foreign cells, and cancer cells. T cells also produce a number of substances that regulate the immune response.

T-cell depletion: Treatment to destroy T cells, which play an important role in the immune response. Elimination of T cells from a bone marrow graft from a donor may reduce the chance of an immune reaction against the recipient's tissues.

T-cell lymphoma (lim-FO-ma): A disease in which certain cells of the lymph system (called T lymphocytes) become cancerous.

T138067: An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called mitotic inhibitors. It inhibits the growth of cancer cells by preventing cell division.

T4N5 liposomal lotion: Enzyme lotion used in treating xeroderma pigmentosum.

Tacrolimus: A drug used to help reduce the risk of rejection by the by the body of organ and bone marrow transplants.

TAG-72 antigen: A protein/sugar complex found on the surface of many cancer cells, including breast, colon, and pancreatic cells.

Tamoxifen: An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called antiestrogens. Tamoxifen blocks the effects of the hormone estrogen in the body. It is used to prevent or delay the return of breast cancer or to control its spread.

Taxanes: Anticancer drugs that inhibit cancer cell growth by stopping cell division. Also called antimitotic or antimicrotubule agents or mitotic inhibitors.

Technetium Tc 99m dex99m dextran: A radio labelled substance that is used in cancer diagnosis.

Technetium Tc 99m sulfur colloid: A radio labelled substance that is used to help identify sites of tumor development.

Tegafur: An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called antimetabolites.

Telangiectasia (tel-AN-gee-ek-TAY-zha): The permanent enlargement of blood vessels, causing redness in the skin or mucous membranes.

Temoporfin: An anticancer drug that is also used in cancer prevention. It belongs to the family of drugs called photosensitizing agents.

Temozolomide: An anticancer drug that belongs to the family of drugs called alkylating agents.

Teniposide: An anticancer drug that is a podophyllotoxin derivative and belongs to the family of drugs called mitotic inhibitors.

Teratoma (ter-a-TOW-ma): A type of germ cell tumor that may contain several different types of tissue, such as hair, muscle, and bone. Teratomas occur most often in the ovaries in women, the testicles in men, and the tailbone in children. Not all teratomas are malignant.

Terminal diseas disease: Disease that cannot be cured and will cause death.

Testicles (TES-tih-kuls): The two egg-shaped glands found inside found inside the scrotum. They produce sperm and male hormones. Also called testes.

Testimonials: Information provided by individuals who claim to have been helped or cured by a particular product. The information provided lacks the necessary elements to be evaluated in a rigorous and scientific manner and is not used in the scientific literature.

Testosterone (tes-TOS-ter-own): A hormone that promotes the development and maintenance of male sex characteristics.

Tetracycline: An antibiotic drug used to treat infection.

TG4010: A substance that is being studied as an anticancer drug.

Thalamus (THAL-a-muss): An area of the brain that helps process information from the senses and transmit it to other parts of the brain.

Thalidomide: A drug that belongs to the family of drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors. It pr. It prevents the growth of new blood vessels into a solid tumor.

Theophylline: A drug used to improve breathing in people who are short of breath. It belongs to the family of drugs called bronchodilators or respiratory smooth muscle relaxants.

Therapeutic: Used to treat disease and help healing take place.